Mastering the fretboard - not!

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bassbass
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Re: Mastering the fretboard - not!

Post by bassbass » 03 Jun 2018, 22:02

Hey George, do you read music? If not, then you should learn. Then I'm sure the fretboard will fall into place for you.

There are tonnes of exercises you can try like playing two-octave scales and forcing yourself to say/sing the note names etc. But these sort of things are pretty dry. Also play every thing you learn through 12 keys, but progress through the circle of 4ths, not just up the board in semitones. And keep the riff low, so it forces you to re-engineer it when you run out of range.

If you do read, then I think the best way to learn the fretboard is to learn sheet music written for other bass clef instruments. If you have a 5 string, 'cello stuff is ideal. Or if you want to learn higher up the fretboard, trombone music is good too. Bear in mind that the bass is a transposing instrument, and the notes will sound an octave lower than they are written, but that's ok.

Best of luck mate.
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ozrider
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Re: Mastering the fretboard - not!

Post by ozrider » 03 Jun 2018, 23:44

bassbass wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 22:02
Hey George, do you read music? If not, then you should learn. Then I'm sure the fretboard will fall into place for you.

There are tonnes of exercises you can try like playing two-octave scales and forcing yourself to say/sing the note names etc. But these sort of things are pretty dry. Also play every thing you learn through 12 keys, but progress through the circle of 4ths, not just up the board in semitones. And keep the riff low, so it forces you to re-engineer it when you run out of range.

If you do read, then I think the best way to learn the fretboard is to learn sheet music written for other bass clef instruments. If you have a 5 string, 'cello stuff is ideal. Or if you want to learn higher up the fretboard, trombone music is good too. Bear in mind that the bass is a transposing instrument, and the notes will sound an octave lower than they are written, but that's ok.

Best of luck mate.
Hey Rob,

It was actually you that pushed me to want to learn all the fretboard. And while I'm slowly trying to say the note names as I play them, I find in a playing situation all that goes out the window. It is just so much easier to see scale patterns and intervals with notes here and there as signposts.

My point is though, for playing pop/funk... well gospel pentatonic runs will get me a long way and I just can't see the point of 'mastering the fretboard' :yep I'd rather work on playing over the bar for instance...

How's things in Melbs?

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bassbass
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Re: Mastering the fretboard - not!

Post by bassbass » 04 Jun 2018, 16:17

Hi mate. There's no stress if you are happy with what you do. The more intellectual scales/chords/full fretboard approach is not for everyone. And there's no harm in playing pentatonics. Most of my favourite rock/pop/folk music is heavily based in pentatonics. I play them in riffs and solos all the time.

But personally, I like being able to conceptualize more deeply into musical landscapes, even 3-chord ones. So I'm always gonna encourage you to keep chipping away at this, because of how much more enjoyable I find playing with all of this bubbling away in my noggin.

As for Smellbourne, it's really warm and sunny, and all the hipsters have moved to Cairns! :P
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