NBD Stingray adventures

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ozrider
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Re: NBD Stingray adventures

Post by ozrider » 07 Oct 2017, 14:59

aphekgreg wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 14:41
narcdor wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 12:37
Solid colour, the year I think the guy I bought it off said it was 2015, I’ll be popping the neck soon for a good cleaning from grinty hands so I will know more soon.
Solid colour. Well that kills that theory..... I had wondered if the ones with the more pronounced grain might have been lighter and more suitable for the clear and 'burst finishes. NotTheFish guessed the weight, based on the grain looking similar to one he used to own. Of course yours could be wide grained, but not quite as uniform to look at, so maybe my theory still works. Probably not. :shrug:
my sr5 has some pretty startling grain but it is certainly one of the heaviest basses I have ever owned. The T-40 I had for a short time may have been heavier. I think the T-40 is so heavy that it may have induced a gravity effect by distorting space-time. So there may have been a perception of latency in my note playing :lol:

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aphekgreg
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Re: NBD Stingray adventures

Post by aphekgreg » 07 Oct 2017, 17:40

ozrider wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 14:59
aphekgreg wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 14:41
narcdor wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 12:37
Solid colour, the year I think the guy I bought it off said it was 2015, I’ll be popping the neck soon for a good cleaning from grinty hands so I will know more soon.
Solid colour. Well that kills that theory..... I had wondered if the ones with the more pronounced grain might have been lighter and more suitable for the clear and 'burst finishes. NotTheFish guessed the weight, based on the grain looking similar to one he used to own. Of course yours could be wide grained, but not quite as uniform to look at, so maybe my theory still works. Probably not. :shrug:
my sr5 has some pretty startling grain but it is certainly one of the heaviest basses I have ever owned. The T-40 I had for a short time may have been heavier. I think the T-40 is so heavy that it may have induced a gravity effect by distorting space-time. So there may have been a perception of latency in my note playing :lol:
My '81 Musician is like that. 5.1kg. I believe it's made of Granite Ash.

My understanding is that hard or northern ash and swamp ash come from the same tree. The stuff at the bottom of the tree, growing in the swamp, retains more water than the wood at the top of the tree. When it gets cut down and dried out, the wood is lightest at the bottom and gets heavier as you progresses up the tree.
Greg

Ibanez Musician, MusicMan, Dingwall Z3, Rickenbacker, MIJ Fender Precision & Jazz, Warmoth/Musikraft P/J-bass, Danelectro Longhorn.
Traynor YBA300, MarkBass, GK1001RB2, Berg AE212, Hartke 4.5, '64 Fender Bassman
http://www.aphekstudio.com.au

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ozrider
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Re: NBD Stingray adventures

Post by ozrider » 07 Oct 2017, 18:07

aphekgreg wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 17:40


My '81 Musician is like that. 5.1kg. I believe it's made of Granite Ash.
:lol:

that's why I own this 5" monster DSL strap (used to own the duostrap, but this seems to work)

http://www.dslstraps.com.au/product/pre ... lackblack/

Image

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drbass
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Re: NBD Stingray adventures

Post by drbass » 07 Oct 2017, 19:09

aphekgreg wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 17:40
ozrider wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 14:59
aphekgreg wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 14:41


Solid colour. Well that kills that theory..... I had wondered if the ones with the more pronounced grain might have been lighter and more suitable for the clear and 'burst finishes. NotTheFish guessed the weight, based on the grain looking similar to one he used to own. Of course yours could be wide grained, but not quite as uniform to look at, so maybe my theory still works. Probably not. :shrug:
my sr5 has some pretty startling grain but it is certainly one of the heaviest basses I have ever owned. The T-40 I had for a short time may have been heavier. I think the T-40 is so heavy that it may have induced a gravity effect by distorting space-time. So there may have been a perception of latency in my note playing :lol:
My '81 Musician is like that. 5.1kg. I believe it's made of Granite Ash.

My understanding is that hard or northern ash and swamp ash come from the same tree. The stuff at the bottom of the tree, growing in the swamp, retains more water than the wood at the top of the tree. When it gets cut down and dried out, the wood is lightest at the bottom and gets heavier as you progresses up the tree.
Same species of tree (Fraxinus americana) but one growing in the warmer southern climates with plenty of water (which means wide-open transport vessels, what we call pores) and the other up north with much smaller pores resulting in higher density.

When first harvested swamp ash is actually VERY heavy because the vessels are filled with water. That’s “cured” by the drying process.

Regards,
Michael
- Kermit 6 fanned, Kermit Gaia 6 fretless, Kermit Rockmachine 5, Manta 5, ME1/5, Q 5, (Sandberg Classic S2-5), (Thumb-4)
- Genzler Magellan 800, 2 Genzler BA12-3
- EBS OctaBass, Boss MS-3, Line6 G50

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aphekgreg
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Re: NBD Stingray adventures

Post by aphekgreg » 08 Oct 2017, 07:24

drbass wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 19:09
aphekgreg wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 17:40
ozrider wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 14:59


my sr5 has some pretty startling grain but it is certainly one of the heaviest basses I have ever owned. The T-40 I had for a short time may have been heavier. I think the T-40 is so heavy that it may have induced a gravity effect by distorting space-time. So there may have been a perception of latency in my note playing :lol:
My '81 Musician is like that. 5.1kg. I believe it's made of Granite Ash.

My understanding is that hard or northern ash and swamp ash come from the same tree. The stuff at the bottom of the tree, growing in the swamp, retains more water than the wood at the top of the tree. When it gets cut down and dried out, the wood is lightest at the bottom and gets heavier as you progresses up the tree.
Same species of tree (Fraxinus americana) but one growing in the warmer southern climates with plenty of water (which means wide-open transport vessels, what we call pores) and the other up north with much smaller pores resulting in higher density.

When first harvested swamp ash is actually VERY heavy because the vessels are filled with water. That’s “cured” by the drying process.

Regards,
Michael
OK. Am I right in thinking that the lower part of the tree growing in the southern climates is lighter than the wood in the upper parts of the tree as well or have I been misinformed?
Greg

Ibanez Musician, MusicMan, Dingwall Z3, Rickenbacker, MIJ Fender Precision & Jazz, Warmoth/Musikraft P/J-bass, Danelectro Longhorn.
Traynor YBA300, MarkBass, GK1001RB2, Berg AE212, Hartke 4.5, '64 Fender Bassman
http://www.aphekstudio.com.au

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aphekgreg
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Re: NBD Stingray adventures

Post by aphekgreg » 08 Oct 2017, 07:28

ozrider wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 18:07
aphekgreg wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 17:40


My '81 Musician is like that. 5.1kg. I believe it's made of Granite Ash.
:lol:

that's why I own this 5" monster DSL strap (used to own the duostrap, but this seems to work)

http://www.dslstraps.com.au/product/pre ... lackblack/

Image
I have 4 of those as well as a couple of the narrower ones I use on the little Ibanez Beans. Great straps.

I won't even try strapping on a bass that's over 4.5kg these days, as my back just can't take it. I almost left the strap buttons off the Musician, so that nobody could put it on a strap.
Greg

Ibanez Musician, MusicMan, Dingwall Z3, Rickenbacker, MIJ Fender Precision & Jazz, Warmoth/Musikraft P/J-bass, Danelectro Longhorn.
Traynor YBA300, MarkBass, GK1001RB2, Berg AE212, Hartke 4.5, '64 Fender Bassman
http://www.aphekstudio.com.au

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drbass
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Re: NBD Stingray adventures

Post by drbass » 08 Oct 2017, 11:03

aphekgreg wrote:
08 Oct 2017, 07:24
drbass wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 19:09
aphekgreg wrote:
07 Oct 2017, 17:40


My '81 Musician is like that. 5.1kg. I believe it's made of Granite Ash.

My understanding is that hard or northern ash and swamp ash come from the same tree. The stuff at the bottom of the tree, growing in the swamp, retains more water than the wood at the top of the tree. When it gets cut down and dried out, the wood is lightest at the bottom and gets heavier as you progresses up the tree.
Same species of tree (Fraxinus americana) but one growing in the warmer southern climates with plenty of water (which means wide-open transport vessels, what we call pores) and the other up north with much smaller pores resulting in higher density.

When first harvested swamp ash is actually VERY heavy because the vessels are filled with water. That’s “cured” by the drying process.

Regards,
Michael
OK. Am I right in thinking that the lower part of the tree growing in the southern climates is lighter than the wood in the upper parts of the tree as well or have I been misinformed?
Hi Greg,

Can't comment specifically on the northern ash case but in very general terms there are always parts of a tree with denser timber, and others with less dense timber. I'll have a bit of a "think" about this (you know, plant physiology and development sort of stuff) and see if I can come up with a more solid answer (no pun intended) and more importantly for me an explanation.

Regards,
Michael
- Kermit 6 fanned, Kermit Gaia 6 fretless, Kermit Rockmachine 5, Manta 5, ME1/5, Q 5, (Sandberg Classic S2-5), (Thumb-4)
- Genzler Magellan 800, 2 Genzler BA12-3
- EBS OctaBass, Boss MS-3, Line6 G50

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drbass
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Re: NBD Stingray adventures

Post by drbass » 09 Oct 2017, 10:42

OK, bear with me, possibly a little more info than you asked for but just trying to make sense.

Here's a pic of a typical white ash tree:
Image

Easy to see the stem going up straight a fair way but branching starts fairly low down the trunk. What does that have to do with density of the wood?

The tree will have certain minimum requirements for water uptake in the root system, and flow into the canopy. All water will have to go through that lower part of the trunk (before branching) which means either larger pores, or more pores (when I say pores I am referring to the water-conduction tissue, the xylem, essentially long "tubes" of now dead cells), or potentially both. That means there is more "empty space" in the timber (of course full of water in a live tree but full of air in dried timber).

As you go up the tree the water is directed into the branches and ultimately the leaves, and the stem will have smaller pores, less pores, or both. That means less "empty space" and therefore denser timber. So that's the "bottom vs top" issue, and this is applicable to pretty much all trees.

There's the environmental factor as well. A "swamp" is generally an area with fairly dense growth (and more often than not warmer temperatures) which means that trees need to grow taller to get enough sunlight. That also needs to happen fairly quickly (and does so in warmer climates) so you end up with a long stem without branching before you get to the canopy. If you take the above first point into consideration with the environmental facto you can hopefully see that a tree grown in warm and wet environments with dense growth should produce less dense wood.

Now please take the above as it is intended to be: a general explanation. In biology there are often more exceptions than actual rule-abiding examples.

Hope that (sort of) helps but happy to answer any follow-on questions.

Regards,
Michael
- Kermit 6 fanned, Kermit Gaia 6 fretless, Kermit Rockmachine 5, Manta 5, ME1/5, Q 5, (Sandberg Classic S2-5), (Thumb-4)
- Genzler Magellan 800, 2 Genzler BA12-3
- EBS OctaBass, Boss MS-3, Line6 G50

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aphekgreg
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Re: NBD Stingray adventures

Post by aphekgreg » 09 Oct 2017, 11:21

Thanks Michael, that's interesting and basically what I've been lead to believe in the past (just with a better explanation).
Greg

Ibanez Musician, MusicMan, Dingwall Z3, Rickenbacker, MIJ Fender Precision & Jazz, Warmoth/Musikraft P/J-bass, Danelectro Longhorn.
Traynor YBA300, MarkBass, GK1001RB2, Berg AE212, Hartke 4.5, '64 Fender Bassman
http://www.aphekstudio.com.au

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Frobie
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Re: NBD Stingray adventures

Post by Frobie » 11 Oct 2017, 03:34

I enjoyed the entire Stingray Adventures thread thanks Greg..great pics too.
I'll add a pic of my MM for you. I call her Pearl...well just because she is loll
Image
Peavey Dynabass 5, EBMM Stingray 5, RickenBacker 4003, Sterling byMusicMan S.U.B. Ray4, Fender CB100CE AcousticBass, Peavey MKIV 1820 Rig, Fender Rumble500 Combo w/115 Cab
Getting paid for something you love doing is a dream fulfilled

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noplanb
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Re: NBD Stingray adventures

Post by noplanb » 11 Oct 2017, 07:23

"a pic of a typical white ash tree"
Doesn't it just make you see bass bodies? ;)
I see..............basses!

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drbass
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Re: NBD Stingray adventures

Post by drbass » 11 Oct 2017, 08:10

noplanb wrote:
11 Oct 2017, 07:23
"a pic of a typical white ash tree"
Doesn't it just make you see bass bodies? ;)
That's all I'm seeing these days ... ;)
- Kermit 6 fanned, Kermit Gaia 6 fretless, Kermit Rockmachine 5, Manta 5, ME1/5, Q 5, (Sandberg Classic S2-5), (Thumb-4)
- Genzler Magellan 800, 2 Genzler BA12-3
- EBS OctaBass, Boss MS-3, Line6 G50

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aphekgreg
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Re: NBD Stingray adventures

Post by aphekgreg » 11 Oct 2017, 08:11

Frobie wrote:
11 Oct 2017, 03:34
I enjoyed the entire Stingray Adventures thread thanks Greg..great pics too.
I'll add a pic of my MM for you. I call her Pearl...well just because she is loll
Image
Very nice. What pickup combinations do you use most? I'm still trying to decide whether to add a neck pickup to mine. I feel like adding a thumb-rest where the second pickup would be, along with the eq, would give me enough tonal variations on this. But then I play the Sabre neck pickup and there's this whole other dimension you don't get with the single pickup.
Greg

Ibanez Musician, MusicMan, Dingwall Z3, Rickenbacker, MIJ Fender Precision & Jazz, Warmoth/Musikraft P/J-bass, Danelectro Longhorn.
Traynor YBA300, MarkBass, GK1001RB2, Berg AE212, Hartke 4.5, '64 Fender Bassman
http://www.aphekstudio.com.au

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narcdor
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Re: NBD Stingray adventures

Post by narcdor » 11 Oct 2017, 09:19

I would have called her Janis!
B: Fender Mustangs, Narcdor Precision, Lindsey Precision, Nash Jazz, Framus Star Bass, EBMM Stingray
A: O'Neill B15 copy, Mesa Walkabout, Ampeg Repro 15, Fender Neo 15
FX: TC Electronic clip on tuner and lotsa fuzz

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aphekgreg
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Re: NBD Stingray adventures

Post by aphekgreg » 12 Oct 2017, 12:17

Just installed the parallel/single/series coil switch. Made a quick comparison clip. The open string at the start gives an idea of the level difference. After that I attempted to match the average level, so I was comparing tone.

Greg

Ibanez Musician, MusicMan, Dingwall Z3, Rickenbacker, MIJ Fender Precision & Jazz, Warmoth/Musikraft P/J-bass, Danelectro Longhorn.
Traynor YBA300, MarkBass, GK1001RB2, Berg AE212, Hartke 4.5, '64 Fender Bassman
http://www.aphekstudio.com.au

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